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Practical Dermatology - Solving the Keloid Conundrum

Achieving complete keloid scar removal is extremely difficult. The SRT-100 is the only FDA cleared treatment after keloid removal option on the market. Recently the machine was featured in an article on Practical Dermatology's website.

Read the full article here.

Sunscreen is meant for the purpose of protecting your skin from the harmful UV rays that cause can sunburn and skin cancer. What you may not realize is that no two sunscreens are entirely alike. Lindsey Carlton from Fox News and dermatologist Dr. Whitney Bowe break down the best sunscreens currently on the market and how to use them correctly.

Read the full article here to find out which sunscreen will keep you covered!

If you are suffering from non-melanoma skin cancer and would like a non-invasive solution, please contact Sensus Healthcare today to inquire about our SRT-100 devices.

Sensus Healthcare utilizes Superficial Radiation Therapy to treat non-melanoma skin cancer non-invasively. Whether you are a patient diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer or a physician in the United States or around the world looking for nonsurgical means to treat your patients, the SRT-100™ could be the solution you are seeking. Contact a Sensus Healthcare representative today.

May 21, 2018 -- Superficial radiation therapy provider Sensus Healthcare has appointed Isabelle Raymond, PhD, as vice president (VP) of clinical development.

Read the full article here.

Dr. Schewe from Alliance Cancer Care Colorado at Red Rocks discusses the revolutionary ways the SRT-100 treats skin cancer. Click the link or watch the video below to learn more.

May 8, 2018 -Dr. Isabelle Raymond Appointed Vice President of Clinical Development of Sensus Healthcare.  Dr. Raymond, who will report to Joe Sardano, Sensus CEO, brings 14 years of medical device and pharmaceutical industry experience to the Company.

Read the full article here.

May 8, 2018 -- Superficial radiation therapy provider Sensus Healthcare has appointed Rita Gable as its new vice president of sales for oncology, effective immediately.

Read the full article here.

May 3, 2018 --Sensus Healthcare, Inc. has appointed Rita Gable as Vice President of Sales – Oncology. Ms. Gable, who will report to Joe Sardano, Sensus CEO, has 15 years of sales experience, specializing in the oncology market.

Read the full article here.

Tony Perkins is a public school teacher in St. Louis. Mr. Perkins has suffered with keloids on his neck and torso for 15 years. Although keloids are benign growths, the weight of them has caused neck pain for Tony. He had undergone several surgeries previously and noticed that the keloids would return within a few months. Mr. Perkins connected with Dr. Michael Jones, a cosmetic and reconstructive surgeon with offices in Atlanta and in New York, and has been subject to the science behind radiation treatment for keloid treatment after removal.

The St. Louis American recently sat down with Mr. Perkins to discuss his progress since interviewing him a year ago. You can read the full article here. If you would like to donate to Tony's medical expenses, you can find his GoFundMe page here.

It is estimated that someone dies from melanoma ever hour, and one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer. However, when skin cancer is detected early, it has a 98% cure rate.

Dr. Dan Siegel is embarking on a journey through the Alaskan wilderness to spread awareness, detection and prevention of skin cancer to the local community.

Connect with us on social media to follow along as we update you on Dr. Siegel's journey to inform the Alaska Native/American Indian population on their risk of developing skin cancer.

Visit Dr. Siegel's donation page to contribute to his journey. Your donation will help to provide free skin cancer screenings for more people across the country. As well as, funding for outdoor shade equipment for parks and educational materials to educate children on the importance of protecting their skin.

Dr. Kevin Schewe, M.D. discusses the early signs and symptoms of skin cancer plus the revolutionary treatment of SRT. View the full interview with 9News.com here.

Dr. Michael H. Gold, a previously featured physician in our Physician Spotlight, has been featured in the Fall 2017 issue of National Black Nurses Association News.  Read the article here.

SRT-100, Game Changer for Keloid Treatment

Treating keloids is very frustrating, not only for the patient suffering from them, but also for the health care provider. A recurrence is fairly common in most therapies. There are many different options for treating keloids and many suggest that they have the magic formula for making keloids disappear. I have been involved in scar and keloid research for almost 30 years and have found that many of the so-called wonder cures for keloids are just here one day and gone the next. What I want to share with you may be the best thing that has happened to keloid therapy in a very long time.

Most dermatologists know that using intralesional (IL) steroids is one of the mainstays of keloid management. Steroids help shrink the lesions over time. We also know that IL steroids can be painful and if not done correctly. It can induce skin atrophy, broken blood vessels, and leave the skin looking abnormal. We also know that the use of topical silicones gels and sheets work well for hypertrophic, or raised scars, but most of the time they do little on their own. This means we need other therapies to make keloids better. We need to reduce the risk of recurrence, which in many cases mean bigger and more painful lesions.

Surgery has been used for years. The recurrence rate for surgery alone is high. It lowers when IL steroids are done after the procedure, but that recurrence number is still not acceptable.

Radiation therapy has also been used and alone, the recurrence rates still remains too high for one to use this modality alone. So what can we do?

Sensus, the leaders in Superficial Radiation Therapy, also known as SRT, recently developed the Sensus SRT 100. A superficial radiation device that has been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of keloids. Clinical studies have shown that if you perform a surgical procedure, to remove the keloid then use the Sensus SRT for three consecutive days after the surgical procedure (fractionating the radiation dose over three days), we can take the recurrence rate from the 60-70% range down to under 10%. It can possibly be even closer to less than 1-2% at one year, which is truly remarkable.

Our office treats lots of keloids and we are so excited to be able to offer to our patients the Sensus SRT procedure for the treatment of keloids. It has changed my mindset, for these were always the patients I knew I had nothing for therapy wise. Now when I see a patient with a keloid –especially those that are large and itchy and painful. I know I can work with my plastic surgical colleagues to remove the keloid and then perform SRT on three consecutive days. I know the patient is going to have a great result with a minimal chance of the keloid recurring.

NBNA - SRT-100, Game Changing Keloid Treatment | Sensus Healthcare

The Sensus SRT has changed my approach to treating keloids. The patient in the picture is an example of someone that has horrific keloids and in the past. I had no clue what would work to make them go away. IL steroids would not work and surgery or radiation alone would mean a high chance of recurrence and more concerns, so this patient was stuck. We used surgery and three fractional SRT treatments, almost 6 months after the procedure he still remains keloid free. I suspect he will not have a recurrence at this point out, in fact, he is so excited that he plans on having even more of his keloids removed in the near future.

The Sensus SRT is a game changer for us and should become standard therapy for all keloids at this time.

NBNA - SRT-100, Game Changing Keloid Treatment | Sensus HealthcareDr. Michael H. Gold is a board-certified dermatologist, cosmetic surgeon and the founder of Gold Skin Care Center, Advanced Aesthetics Medical Spa, The Laser & Rejuvenation Center, and Tennessee Clinical Research Center located in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Surgeon General has released a Call to Action to address Skin Cancer as a major public health problem. The executive summary includes strategies for prevention with clear and concisely outlined goals.

Click the link below to read the full article.

The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer

The expected increase of keloid scar occurrences, the shift from Mohs surgery as well as developments in advanced cryosurgery and radiation therapy devices will bring about an increase in the demand for keloid treatment.

Read more: Global Keloid Treatment Market to Reach US $4.4 Billion by 2027

Sensus Healthcare's FDA cleared low energy x-ray technology was the highlight of the discussion when Sensus Healthcare CEO, Joe Sardano, sat down with Medgadget's Alice Ferng to discuss the benefits of using the SRT-100 and SRT-100 Vision.

Click here to view the article.

Looking to set yourself apart from the crowd in business or in life? Find out what Sensus Healthcare Co-Founder, Chairman and CEO, Joseph Sardano, has to say about it in Christina DesMarais's article 24 Simple Daily Habits These High Achievers Swear by for Their Success on Inc.com. It's that simple!

"When you manage a results oriented company you must find a way to be positive about approaching each situation and resolving it while ensuring a positive outcome. At the end of the day, never confuse activities with success. Regardless of the situation, results are what counts so look to accomplish something major every day, approach it with a positive mindset and produce a positive result."

--Joe Sardano, cofounder, chairman and CEO of Sensus Healthcare, a medical device company providing non-invasive and cost-effective treatment options for non-melanoma skin cancers and keloids

Click here to view the full article

Government initiatives to raise awareness of non-melanoma skin cancer

Non-melanoma skin cancer is usually treated as a simple lesion in the initial stages but if not treated properly, it can quickly mushroom and spread to other body parts. Government authorities and regulatory bodies are working overtime to educate people about non-melanoma skin cancer and its debilitating effect on the nation’s economy. This is particularly in the developed world. For e.g. – Cancer Council Australia has unveiled the SunSmart program to raise awareness of non-melanoma skin cancer. This could not be done sooner as Australia suffers a great deal from non-melanoma skin cancer and has the highest prevalence in the APAC region. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare estimates that skin cancer is the largest cancer diagnosed in the country and nearly 1800 people lost their lives to it in 2016. The A&Z non-melanoma skin cancer treatment market is anticipated to be valued at more than US$ 705 Mn at the end of the forecast period making it larger than the rest of the APAC region combined.

Radiation therapy dominates non-melanoma skin cancer treatment market

Radiation therapy has a market share approaching 90% in the non-melanoma skin cancer treatment market in 2017 itself and is unlikely to cede this commanding position anytime soon. Radiation therapy has a value of approx. US$ 4.8 Bn by end 2025 making it considerably larger than both chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy. Within radiation therapy, external beam radiation therapy is currently the largest in terms of market value. However, the highest CAGR of 9.6% for the period 2017-2025 is anticipated to be witnessed in the superficial radiation therapy segment as this newer treatment has relatively lesser side-effects making it preferable for patient health in the long run. The market attractiveness of radiation therapy in the non-melanoma skin cancer treatment market is expected to be 2.7 and the development of portable radiation therapy devices should further propel the non-melanoma skin cancer treatment market.

Numerous complications linked to conventional radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is used to treat non-melanoma skin cancer lesions in cases where surgery is not possible such as the nose tip, eyelids, and other extremities. Unfortunately, radiation therapy causes serious side-effects depending on the treatment area size, radiation dose, and exposure duration. Some of the complications include edema, skin peeling, skin problems, and hair loss. All these challenges restrain the growth of radiation therapy in the non-melanoma skin cancer treatment market.

Superficial radiation therapy adopted in clinics for lesser side-effects

The development of standalone radiation therapy machines has led to their widespread acceptance in dermatology clinics to treat non-melanoma skin cancer. These highly portable devices are used because they have comparatively lesser side-effects. Sensus Healthcare has created SRT radiation therapy devices to treat non-melanoma skin cancer as they are a highly effective form of treatment with much lesser side-effects. These devices have the added benefit of being more economical compared to conventional radiation therapy devices. Sensus Healthcare has sold more than 300 superficial radiation therapy devices in the U.S. alone and this number is increasing by the day.

Click here to view the original article from Military-Technologies.net.

Innovating upon a tried-and-true technology, an updated device is available for dermatologists to use to fight skin cancer.

By Jeffrey Fromowitz, MD, FAAD

As a dermatologist in practice in Boca Raton, FL, I am at the front lines of the ever-growing skin cancer epidemic. As such, I am always searching for new tools that allow me and my practice to more safely and effectively treat our patients’ skin cancers. Nearly two years ago, we added an additional option in our practice: the SRT-100 from Sensus Healthcare.

The SRT-100 is a superficial radiotherapy (SRT) device that delivers precise, calibrated low-dose radiation that effectively destroys basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Superficial radiotherapy and Orthovoltage, an X-ray-based technology that was first developed in the mid-1900s, were essentially created by dermatologists to safely treat oncological and non-oncological skin conditions—and in their heyday were present in more than half of dermatology offices across the nation.

SRT: Innovating a Proven Treatment for Skin Cancer

SRT: Innovating a Proven Treatment for Skin Cancer Treatment

Before SRT (top), mid-way through treatment (middle), and after treatment (bottom)

As time went on, device manufacturers stopped innovating upon and supporting this technology; as a result, the machines broke down and the technology fell out of favor. Sensus Healthcare, recognizing the opportunity to innovate upon this tried-and-true technology, created an updated device for dermatologists to use that allows for consistency and predictable results when it comes to the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and keloids.

The SRT-100 device uses photons in the 50 to 200 peak kilovoltage range, which make this energy ideally suited for treating skin cancer, as it delivers its maximum energy at the skin’s surface and penetrates to a depth of approximately 5mm. The profile allows us a safe, effective, and predictable non-surgical alternative to treat non-melanoma skin cancer. It is an ideal choice for many of our patients who have significant comorbidities and in whom surgery can be high risk.

Traditionally, when treating non-melanoma skin cancer, Mohs micrographic surgery is seen as the go-to treatment. While Mohs or other surgical techniques remain first-line therapies, according to recent American Academy of Dermatology guidelines, the SRT-100 provides an alternative option that we have used to better treat certain patients with certain tumor types. For example, SRT has become our go-to treatment for anatomically difficult lesions, such as large basal and squamous cell carcinomas on the shin, scalp, ear, and nose. It is also a nice option for patients who are poor surgical candidates because of anticoagulation therapy, diabetes, heart disease, or the large multitude of comorbidities that skin cancer patients often suffer from that could impede wound healing.

To better illustrate the results of SRT treatment, I present an example of a case where SRT was the chosen treatment option. (See images, previous page) The patient was a 96-year-old woman with a three-month history of a non-healing ulceration on her left lower lip. She came to our office because the lesion had become increasingly painful and was bleeding, often interfering with her activities in daily life. A biopsy was performed and demonstrated a nodular ulcerated basal cell carcinoma with squamous differentiation. The patient also had a history of atrial fibrillation and was on blood thinners. Given the location, size of the lesion, patient’s age, and comorbid medical conditions, she wanted a non-surgical alternative to treat this skin cancer. The patient was concerned about the impact of surgery and the rehabilitation process, including a potential risk of bleeding or infection, and healing time.

As we discussed treatments options, she elected to treat this BCC with SRT. SRT treatments are delivered in multiple short sessions dependent upon the amount of energy needed for the total treatments, as well as the area being treated. To adequately treat this lesion, 12 treatment sessions were required. The actual time each session lasted was around 30 seconds. This patient received 12 fractions at 70kv and a dose of 380.6cGy per fraction. Photographs (previous page) show her at baseline, mid-way through treatment, and one month after the treatment was completed. As you can see, she had complete resolution of the basal cell—with outstanding cosmetic results. This patient shared our assessment and was pleased to have treated this skin cancer completely with a non-invasive approach sparing her the stress of surgery.

Jeffrey Fromowitz, MD, FAAD at Dermatology of Boca, Boca Raton, FL, uses the SRT-100 from Sensus Healthcare.

Source: Practical Dermatology

Innovating upon a tried-and-true technology, an updated device is available for dermatologists to use to fight skin cancer.

BY JEFFREY FROMOWITZ, MD

As a dermatologist in practice in Boca Raton, FL, I am upon this tried-and-true technology, created an updated at the front lines of the ever-growing skin cancer epidemic. As such, I am always searching for new tools that allow me and my practice to more safely and effectively treat our patients’ skin cancers. Nearly two years ago, we added an additional option in our practice: the SRT-100 from Sensus Healthcare.

The SRT-100 is a superficial radiotherapy (SRT) device that delivers precise, calibrated low-dose radiation that effectively destroys basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Superficial radiotherapy and Orthovoltage, an X-ray-based technology that was first developed in the mid-1900s, were essentially created by dermatologists to safely treat oncological and non-oncological skin conditions—and in their heyday were present in more than half of dermatology offices across the nation.

As time went on, device manufacturers stopped innovating upon and supporting this technology; as a result, the machines broke down and the technology fell out of favor. Sensus Healthcare, recognizing the opportunity to innovate device for dermatologists to use that allows for consistency and predictable results when it comes to the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and keloids.

The SRT-100 device uses photons in the 50 to 200 peak kilovoltage range, which make this energy ideally suited for treating skin cancer, as it delivers its maximum energy at the skin’s surface and penetrates to a depth of approximately 5mm. The profile allows us a safe, effective, and predictable non-surgical alternative to treat non-melanoma skin cancer. It is an ideal choice for many of our patients who have significant comorbidities and in whom surgery can be high risk.

Traditionally, when treating non-melanoma skin cancer, Mohs micrographic surgery is seen as the go-to treatment. While Mohs or other surgical techniques remain first-line therapies, according to recent American Academy of Dermatology guidelines, the SRT-100 provides an alternative option that we have used to better treat certain patients with certain tumor types. For example, SRT has become our go-to treatment for anatomically difficult lesions, such as large basal and squamous cell carcinomas on the shin, scalp, ear, and nose. It is also a nice option for patients who are poor surgical candidates because of anticoagulation therapy, diabetes, heart disease, or the large multitude of comorbidities that skin cancer patients often suffer from that could impede wound healing.

SRT: An Innovating and New Treatment to Fight Skin Cancer

To better illustrate the results of SRT treatment, I present an example of a case where SRT was the chosen treatment option. (See images, previous page) The patient was a 96-year-old woman with a three-month history of a non- healing ulceration on her left lower lip. She came to our office because the lesion had become increasingly painful and was bleeding, often interfering with her activities in daily life. A biopsy was performed and demonstrated a nodular ulcerated basal cell carcinoma with squamous differentiation.

The patient also had a history of atrial fibrillation and was on blood thinners. Given the location, size of the lesion, patient’s age, and comorbid medical conditions, she wanted a non- surgical alternative to treat this skin cancer. The patient was concerned about the impact of surgery and the rehabilitation process, including a potential risk of bleeding or infection, and healing time.

As we discussed treatments options, she elected to treat this BCC with SRT. SRT treatments are delivered in multiple short sessions dependent upon the amount of energy needed for the total treatments, as well as the area being treated.
To adequately treat this lesion, 12 treatment sessions were required. The actual time each session lasted was around 30 seconds. This patient received 12 fractions at 70kv and a dose of 380.6cGy per fraction. Photographs (previous page) show her at baseline, mid-way through treatment, and one month after the treatment was completed. As you can see, she had complete resolution of the basal cell—with outstanding cosmetic results. This patient shared our assessment and was pleased to have treated this skin cancer completely with a non-invasive approach sparing her the stress of surgery.

Jeffrey Fromowitz, MD, FAAD at Dermatology of Boca, Boca Raton, FL, uses the SRT-100 from Sensus Healthcare.

Be sure to read next month’s edition, with a look at another alternative intervention for NMSC treatment: Electronic brachytherapy (eBx). David Berman, MD writes about his experience.

Click here to view the original article from Practical Dermatology.

CEO Joseph Sardano says skin cancer is often catching up with people earlier in life than it used to.

Sensus Healthcare Inc. (SRTS) is marketing devices that offer some non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) patients an alternative to traditional Mohs surgery.

Boca Raton, Fla.-based Sensus' superficial radiation therapy (SRT) technology allows doctors to apply radiation skin-deep, rather than irradiating other tissue that does not need treatment. It can also treat keloid skin growths.

Skin cancer includes melanoma, which affects cells producing the pigment melanin, and NMSC, which takes the form of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. Basal cell cancer occurs in the skin as does squamous cell cancer, but the latter is more likely to grow deeper into the skin and spread.

Occasionally NMSC can affect other parts of the body, including lymph glands.

Mohs surgery, invented by Dr. Frederick Mohs in the 1930s, has long been the first line of defense against basal and squamous cell cancers, and it allows surgeons to pare down the cancerous skin without going deeper and damaging other tissue.

At the time, it's not a process many people wish to repeat and, according to Sensus co-founder and CEO Joseph Sardano, physicians and Mohs surgeons may recommend that patients opt for superficial radiation therapy.

Mohs treatment can leave scarring or lead to infections, and some patients may not be able to tolerate the process.

Sardano also noted that while there only about 1,000 Mohs specialists in the country, the incidence of skin cancer is growing at a fast clip.

"The effects of U.V. exposure have tended to incubate over a long period of time and then manifest when patients are in their 60s," Sardano told The Deal. "But over the last decade there has been a 400% increase in NMSC in women between the ages of 18 and 40."

Sardano said that widespread use of tanning beds is likely responsible for much of the increase.

He also noted other causes that have nothing to do with U.V. exposure, including environmental factors. People who received organ transplants are also extremely likely to develop skin cancer. The skin -- an organ itself -- may react adversely to the transplant.

A word to the wise from Sardano - the human nose is the sun's first target, and Mohs and other surgeries to handle cancer manifesting on the nose are not pleasant to undergo and may have aesthetically unappealing results.

The Sensus SRT-100 device applies radiation to a maximum depth of about five millimeters, sparing the tissue and bone beneath from the potentially harsh effects of radiation.

The SRT-Vision device incorporates ultrasound imaging technology, which allows the surgeon to track the progress of the radiation where it's not visible to the naked eye. At the same time, the radiation level can be adjusted closely.

The company works with Pinnacle Health Group to reimburse patients.

Business is heating up for the company, which recently reported June quarter results. The company posted revenues of $4.97 million, up from $3.57 million in the same period last year.

On a six-month basis, revenues were up over 40% to $9.32 million.

Source: TheStreet.com

Boca Raton medical device maker Sensus Healthcare has been cleared to expand operations in China, bringing its skin-treatment technology to a country with more than 1.4 billion people.

Sensus Healthcare (NASDAQ: SRTS) has made a name for itself in the medical community with the SRT-100, a device sold to dermatology practices which non-invasively treats skin conditions, including keloids, a type of benign fibrous tissue formed at the area of scars or injury to the skin.

Scientists have found that keloids appear most frequently among those of African, Latin and Asian descent. Since China relaxed its one-child policy two years ago, the incidence of keloids has increased due to the prevalence of Cesarean section births. The delivery procedure is known to cause scarring.

Sensus will partner with Chindex Medical Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Shanghai-based Fosun Pharma International, which already sold the device in China almost exclusively for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer.

"CFDA clearance of the SRT-100 for the treatment and prevention of keloids is an important milestone for Sensus, and a step forward for healthcare in China, especially women's health," said Sensus CEO Joe Sardano.

Founded in 2010, Sensus went public in the summer of 2016, with shares trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the ticker SRTS. The company has a market capitalization of about $59 million. Last year, the company booked revenue of more than $14 million, a 44 percent uptick compared to revenue generated in 2015.

Click here to view the original article on South Florida Business Journal.

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